Unofficial site of group TATU


Unofficial forum of group TATU
Go Back   Unofficial forum of group TATU General Forum General discussions


Slavic Languages


ReplyPost New Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old 18-06-2003, 02:44   #201
freddie freddie is offline
Sad Little Monkey
 
freddie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Slovenia
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,736

Send a message via AIM to freddie Send a message via MSN to freddie Send a message via Yahoo to freddie
PolishFanInUSA

Well polish fan then make some contribution to our thread... First answer Russkayatatu's grammar question's or translate a tatu song or two to your language so we can compare.

Or at least for the begining tell us how to say good day, good morning, good night, hello and that sort of stuff in polish language.
~~~~~~~~~~~
freddie | TatySite.net t.E.A.m. [ multyman@hotmail.com ]

Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18-06-2003, 02:47   #202
QueenBee QueenBee is offline
pie crust
 
QueenBee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: where everybody knows my name
Age: 29
Gender: Female
Posts: 11,821

freddie, Ive said that already
But it's nice to repeat.
~~~~~~~~~~~
Monika | TatySite.net t.E.A.m. [ <3 ] [ 11 ]
  Reply With Quote
Old 18-06-2003, 02:52   #203
freddie freddie is offline
Sad Little Monkey
 
freddie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Slovenia
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,736

Send a message via AIM to freddie Send a message via MSN to freddie Send a message via Yahoo to freddie
Quote:
Originally posted by queenbee
freddie, Ive said that already
But it's nice to repeat.
Sorry, that's right you did.

Well... on to the grammatical questions then LOL
~~~~~~~~~~~
freddie | TatySite.net t.E.A.m. [ multyman@hotmail.com ]

Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18-06-2003, 12:39   #204
russkayatatu russkayatatu is offline
Echoes among the Stars
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: USA
Age: 36
Posts: 770

Ehh, freddie, Iґm sorry to have left for so long Let's see what I can say here.

Yes, Russian has "leto" for "summer." Year is "god," and it declines regularly except in the genitive plural, when it becomes "let" - so you say "mnogo let" for "many years," or "pjat' let" for "five years," but for one and two you have odin god and dva goda. Iґm guessing that it came from "leto" (five summers ago = five years ago) but I don't really know.

Adj. in Russian added is in gen. as well, but the thing is that the adjective is always in gen. pl. for all numbers except one even if the noun is in gen. sg. (like for dva goda). Except in fem. when the genitive singular of the noun is the same form as the nominative plural like I mentioned. I think technically it MIGHT be OK to say "dve xoroshix (genitive plural) knigi" instead of "dve xoroshie (nominative) knigi" for "two good books," but nobody does.

freddie, I think you got most of what I meant Iґm kind of confused as to how it works in Slovene though...is ljudi in pet dobrih ljudi the same as nominative? In Russian the adjective is always in genitive plural except for 2, 3, and 4 for feminine nouns that decline regularly. Does Slovene have different rules? It looks like a lot of the same (e.g., Eno dobro leto, dve dobri leti, pet dobrih let) but I'm kind of lost with your last example

Last edited by russkayatatu; 20-07-2003 at 20:51.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20-07-2003, 21:35   #205
russkayatatu russkayatatu is offline
Echoes among the Stars
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: USA
Age: 36
Posts: 770

This has a little to do with what we were talking about before...not a lot, but I thought maybe I would share this story of my confusion with all the South Slavic languages

Recently I was in Bulgaria and decided to listen to the radio - I like to do that in foreign countries cause I can listen to what's playing, plus it's fun to see how much I can understand of the news - and I found a station (Signal Plus? I don't remember exactly) that was playing something obviously not the usual W. hits [cool, I am not sure if it was chowga; I remember everything you told me about it but am not sure I could recognize it again after hearing it just that once ] although it was definitely Slavic. And I could pick out some of the words - Bulgarian words - I don't remember them now but it was something about you not loving me and are doing something else, I love you but I'm going to leave, and I got excited and thought, sweet, now I know enough Bulgarian to listen to songs and know what they're talking about

Not that this is hard to do, though; about a year ago I started listening to compilations of "hit Russian songs" - Goryachaya Desyatka - (although with other Russ. songs) and for the most part the lyrics are SO SIMPLE: examples: "solnce ne solnce, leto ne leto, esli so mnoiu tebya ryadom netu, more ne more, pesnya ne pesnya ah ah" ("the sun's not the sun, the summer's not the summer, if you're not beside me; the sea's not the sea, the song's not the song, ah ah" . Also typical: "perepishu liubov' i novyi den' nochnu ya bez tebya; ne povtvoritsia vnov' so mnoi istoriya moya" and "ty poceluesh' no ne liubish' no ne liubish'" and "ya za tebia umru" (I rewrite my love and start a new day without you; my story won't repeat itself again with me," "you'll kiss but you don't love, don't love," "I'll die for you"). If you know about 10 key words - or even less, just "I," "me," "you," and "love," you'll get at least half of most songs...ha ha, I used to think that writing Russian lyrics like that was easy and fun and wrote little poems: "dnem o tebe ya mectaiu, nochiu ty snish'sya mne" (I dream about you during the day, at night I see you in my sleep) before I realized that it was authentic but total crap But seriously, I remember watching MTV Russia when I was in Moscow and seeing a clip where the lyrics were (I swear I am not making this up; I remembered them because they were sooooo bad): "ya ne znaiu pocemu v ponedel'nik ya ne p'iu, v sredu ya sovsem ne spliu ya pyatnicu liubliu" (I don't know why on Monday I don't drink, on Wednesday I don't sleep at all, I love Fridays). So with lyrics like that it is usually not hard to figure out what songs mean even if you have only been studying a language for a short time

Anyway, I was listening to this song in Bulgarian and could sort of understand it, and then another song came on where I couldn't pick out any words, and then another - and I kind of stopped listening for a while - and then I heard "volish, volish" and thought WAIT...that can't be Bulgarian...because "volish" sounds only like "volja," a little, so it must be Serbian or something; I AM going to get confused So I stopped listening to Balkan "chowga" and found another station, which I think was BG National Radio (they said something like "only" - or "all" - Bulgarian music, along with the station name), so I could listen to something that wouldn't mess me up more than necessary I suppose another fun game to play, rather than "guess the lyrics," might have been "guess the language," although I am not that good yet - I can hear that it's Slavic, but that's about it, unless it uses one of the < 50 Bulgarian words I know...other than that...I'm lost

It was fun listening to the radio and hearing songs like "Obiche me" ("love me") though

Last edited by russkayatatu; 20-07-2003 at 22:49.
  Reply With Quote
Old 21-07-2003, 00:13   #206
MrZebra MrZebra is offline
Гн. Зебра
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Montreal, Canada
Age: 41
Posts: 54

Send a message via ICQ to MrZebra
So I'm not the only one! The concept of using Audio Pattern Matching techniques to figure out some words in foreign languages. I do that all the time and I'd say 80% of the russian words I learned by listening to Тату were cases like that. Heard the part of the lyrics, made a guess, looked up the lyrics translation and found I was right.

Also in Charlie's Angels 2, at the beginning, one of the girls said "I'm no angel" in a foreign language (Pretty sure it's a Slavic language givin that my very limited knowledge of Russian helped me understand it) and I recognized it (Not just reading the subtitles)

That was kinda scary but cool at the same time!

Now if I can leverage this more and more, I could learn Russian rather quickly if I pay more attention to Тату lyrics. (And watch a couple of russian movies, so maybe I can blind-purchase Russian Ark on DVD when it comes out)
  Reply With Quote
Old 21-07-2003, 11:18   #207
coolasfcuk coolasfcuk is offline
Bitchka
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 5,015

russkayatatu, haha not bad !! Yes, 'Signal Plus' is Chalga station !!! , so most likely, there was some serbian songs from time to time. The other one, I think is 'BG radio', which plays only bulgarian music

I must say, and I told you before, you did Great in bulgarian !!! None of the other americans/westerners that have come to BG (that I know of) can order in the restaurants or ask for directions, etc by themselves in bulgarian

Bravo, mnogo dobre se spravi !!! Otlichno dazhe !
~~~~~~~~~~~
oh... o!
  Reply With Quote
Old 24-07-2003, 21:35   #208
russkayatatu russkayatatu is offline
Echoes among the Stars
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: USA
Age: 36
Posts: 770

coolasfcuk, ha ha, thank you I thought it was Chalga but I wasn't sure

I was asked a while ago, and maybe it will be interesting for other people: how to say "I masturbate" in Russian? The noun is "masturbacia," and the verb, I see as I look it up, is "masturbirovat'," so it would be: "ya masturbiruiu." My Russian is not good for a lot of vocabulary, but usually I can tell when it's too big a leap and it sounds like it could be wrong: most foreign verbs end in -ovat' in Russian and conjugate -uiu, -uesh', -uet, -uem, -uete, -uiut: for example: tancovat' ("to dance," sounds kind of Germanic to me), and you get "ya tancuiu." Masturbate I wasn't sure about, cause 1) this word has come up only ONCE in my reading/conversations (wait a second, ha HA HA, no, actually twice: in articles about tatu and PD and in an article in Russian Cosmopolitan titled "Muzh ili Dush" (get that??) LoL ), but in any case it's usually "zanimat'sia masturbacii" as far as I remember, and 2) it's a borrowed word, so I was trying to think if it could be an -ovat' type even though you had the noun "masturbacia," which would seemingly make it easy to conjugate "masturbaiu," "masturbaesh'," etc.

See, up until now I never bothered to look it up, and if pressed would say, "ya zanimaius' masturbacii," except that's too many syllables to sing along with PD And I knew there must be another word, I just didn't know it then.

Do foreign words have a common conjugation in other Slavic languages, I wonder? -Ovat' in Russian is pretty widespread.

Last edited by russkayatatu; 24-07-2003 at 23:22.
  Reply With Quote
Old 25-07-2003, 16:44   #209
coolasfcuk coolasfcuk is offline
Bitchka
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 5,015

russkayatatu, ha ha ha Why does your question remind me of Tony, Prostye Dvizhenya and me.... ..... "ya masturbaiuuuu'... ha ha, btw Tony said that because 'masturbaiu' sounded Russian to him - ha ha ha, not for any other reason...the 'iu' at the end did it

In bulgarian we would say: 'az masturbiram' or we can also say the long version that you have prefered so far: 'zanimavam se s masturbacia' but that sounds too long and people wont use it as much

yes, verbs have common conjugation ovat, yat, yam, etc too hard for me to think right now of all, but hope you get the point, it is the same as in Russian
~~~~~~~~~~~
oh... o!
  Reply With Quote
Old 27-07-2003, 23:43   #210
russkayatatu russkayatatu is offline
Echoes among the Stars
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: USA
Age: 36
Posts: 770

The long version that I've "preferred," ha ha, are you kidding, it's just the only way I knew how to say it "V etom klipe Lena proxodit vremya v kafe, p'et vodu i zhdet svoyu podrugu, a Yulya poka v bane zanimaetsia masturbacii..." something like that I'm guessing it's not so popular either, probably mostly written, plus another problem is that it can easily sound like you do it all the time (rather than are just doing it now) if you're not careful

And yeah, "masturbaiu" does sound like it could a Russian word, but it's not - "masturbiruiu" instead.

Bulgarian has a common conj. (ovat) too? Great, close again. You know, I can read magazine articles (at least articles from some magazines) in Bulgarian with comprehension of maybe 70-75%. Reading reeeeaaally slowly, but still...not too bad It helps (and is more fun) when there are pictures, though

Last edited by russkayatatu; 27-07-2003 at 23:53.
  Reply With Quote
ReplyPost New Thread

Bookmarks


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Forum Languages Talyubittu Questions to the Moderators 2 30-01-2007 02:17
English songs in other languages. catmincenz Sports and Entertainment 0 13-02-2006 03:01
Something Interesting For All My Slavic Brothas & Sistahs freddie General discussions 24 06-01-2004 20:19
::counterpart for the slavic thread:: Spanish Talkers! Kappa General discussions 56 07-07-2003 04:56
What languages do they speak? FadingAway News and Events 43 25-02-2003 15:42



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:26.




© 2001-2008 Unofficial site of group TATU

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.